Dale Chihuly
 

Chihuly in the Park: A Garden of Glass
Chihuly Exhibition at Garfield Park Extended
The Garfield Park Conservatory in Chicago is the one of the largest conservatories in the nation. Beginning last November, Chihuly installed works among the plants, suspended in space or floating in water in nearly every room in the two-acre building. The Garfield Park exhibition, titled 'Chihuly in the Park: A Garden of Glass' has been extended and will run until November 4, 2002.
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    The Chicago Park District, in cooperation with the Boeing Company, is honored to host the famed artist, Dale Chihuly, for the exciting exhibit "Chihuly in the Park: A Garden of Glass." Chihuly's installations at the Garfield Park Conservatory highlights both the important plant collections inside as well as the glass structure in which they are housed.

    In one of the largest and most stunning conservatories in the nation Chihuly's work is floating on water or nestled amongst picturesque gardens in nearly every room of the facility.

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    Experience the world of Chihuly and view his magnificent work against the living, breathing backdrop of the plant kingdom. This exhibition is intended to tie the artwork and the plants together as one, as each enhances the best qualities of the other. This first time exhibit in a conservatory will be on display till May 19, 2002.

    Dale Chihuly has works on display in more than 200 museums around the world. Now for the first time Chihuly's dynamic, ravishingly beautiful creations will mingle with nature in a house made of glass.

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    "When I was in Chicago to participate in the city's Millennium Celebration, I visited the Garfield Park Conservatory, a wonderful glass treasure in the heart of the city's Westside," said Dale Chihuly. "Walking through the largest indoor garden house in the country, I was immediately inspired to create an exhibition that would be unique to this historic conservatory and to the city of Chicago."

    Creations featured in the exhibit were selected to enhance the charming natural environment of the Conservatory. Some works of art float effortlessly in the calm waters of the Fern Room pool while others grow skyward and tower alongside the Conservatory's majestic palm trees.

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    "Chihuly has had breath-taking displays featured in a variety of expected and unexpected locations," said Chicago Park District Conservatory Director Dr. Lisa Roberts. "The Chicago Park District is honored to have Chihuly create an installation for the Conservatory, a house built using the medium he is known for."

    "Using the Garfield Park Conservatory as an exhibit space is new to us," said Chicago Park District General Superintendent David Doig. "Our staff was very interested in exploring new ways to bring Chicago families to the Conservatory. In the past we have created new light displays to mingle with our flower shows, or opened our doors for concerts, but this is another unique event for the glass house, which we hope will be the first of many."

    Chihuly's glass works include spectacular sculptures for the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. In 1999, Chihuly mounted his most ambitious exhibit to date: "Chihuly in the Light of Jerusalem 2000" in which he created 15 installations within the stone walls of the Tower of David Museum of the History of Jerusalem. Also in Jerusalem, Chihuly erected a 64-ton wall of ice.

    Using traditional craftsmen's methods of the ancient Romans, Chihuly elevated glassmaking to a new art form. His seminal works are wildly vibrant. His creations have been described as "... delicately organic to the extravagantly florid ... the full drama of superlative glassblowing in which the molten material is taken to the furthest extremes of size and stretchability."


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